CACR3 (2009) Detail

Relating to public schools. Providing that: it shall be the duty of the legislature to encourage the interest of literature and the sciences and all seminaries and public schools.


CACR 3 – AS INTRODUCED

2009 SESSION

09-0160

06/09

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 3

RELATING TO: public schools.

PROVIDING THAT: it shall be the duty of the legislature to encourage the interest of literature and the sciences and all seminaries and public schools.

SPONSORS: Rep. Rowe, Hills 6; Rep. W. O'Brien, Hills 4; Rep. L. Ober, Hills 27; Rep. Villeneuve, Hills 18; Rep. Renzullo, Hills 27

COMMITTEE: Education

ANALYSIS

This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution provides that the legislature shall encourage the interest of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools.

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Explanation: Matter added to current law appears in bold italics.

Matter removed from current law appears [in brackets and struckthrough.]

Matter which is either (a) all new or (b) repealed and reenacted appears in regular type.

09-0160

06/09

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

In the Year of Our Lord Two Thousand Nine

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION PROPOSING CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

RELATING TO: public schools.

PROVIDING THAT: it shall be the duty of the legislature to encourage the interest of literature and the sciences and all seminaries and public schools.

Be it Resolved by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring, that the

Constitution of New Hampshire be amended as follows:

I. That article 83 of the second part of the constitution be amended to read as follows:

[Art.] 83. [Encouragement of Literature, etc.; Control of Corporations, Monopolies, etc.] Knowledge and learning, generally diffused through a community, being essential to the preservation of a free government; and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education through the various parts of the country, being highly conducive to promote this end; it shall be the duty of the legislators and magistrates, in all future periods of this government, to [cherish] encourage the interest of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools, to encourage private and public institutions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and natural history of the country; to countenance and inculcate the principles of humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity, industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, sobriety, and all social affections, and generous sentiments, among the people: Provided, nevertheless, that no money raised by taxation shall ever be granted or applied for the use of the schools of institutions of any religious sect or denomination. Free and fair competition in the trades and industries is an inherent and essential right of t he people and should be protected against all monopolies and conspiracies which tend to hinder or destroy it. The size and functions of all corporations should be so limited and regulated as to prohibit fictitious capitalization and provision should be made for the supervision and government thereof. Therefore, all just power possessed by the state is hereby granted to the general court to enact laws to prevent the operations within the state of all persons and associations, and all trusts and corporations, foreign or domestic, and the officers thereof, who endeavor to raise the price of any article of commerce or to destroy free and fair competition in the trades and industries through combination, conspiracy, monopoly, or any other unfair means; to control and regulate the acts of all such persons, associations, corporations, trusts, and officials doing business within the state; to prevent fictitious capitalization; and to authorize civil and criminal proceedings in respect to all the wrongs herein declared against.

II. That the above amendment proposed to the constitution be submitted to the qualified voters of the state at the state general election to be held in November, 2010.

III. That the selectmen of all towns, cities, wards, and places in the state are directed to insert in their warrants for the said 2010 election an article to the following effect: To decide whether the amendments of the constitution proposed by the 2009 session of the general court shall be approved.

IV. That the wording of the question put to the qualified voters shall be:

“Are you in favor of amending the second part of the constitution by amending article 83 to read as follows:

[Art.] 83. [Encouragement of Literature, etc.; Control of Corporations, Monopolies, etc.] Knowledge and learning, generally diffused through a community, being essential to the preservation of a free government; and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education through the various parts of the country, being highly conducive to promote this end; it shall be the duty of the legislators and magistrates, in all future periods of this government, to encourage the interest of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools, to encourage private and public institutions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and natural history of the country; to countenance and inculcate the principles of humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity, industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, sobriety, and all social affections, and generous sentiments, among the people: Provided, nevertheless, that no money raised by taxation shall ever be granted or applied for the use of the schools of institutions of any religious sect or denomination. Free and fair competition in the trades and industries is an inherent and essential right of the people and should be protected against all monopolies and conspiracies which tend to hinder or destroy it. The size and functions of all corporations should be so limited and regulated as to prohibit fictitious capitalization and provision should be made for the supervision and government thereof. Therefore, all just power possessed by the state is hereby granted to the general court to enact laws to prevent the operations within the state of all persons and associations, and all trusts and corporations, foreign or domestic, and the officers thereof, who endeavor to raise the price of any article of commerce or to destroy free and fair competition in the trades and industries through combination, conspiracy, monopoly, or any other unfair means; to control and regulate the acts of all such persons, associations, corporations, trusts, and officials doing business within the state; to prevent fictitious capitalization; and to authorize civil and criminal proceedings in respect to all the wrongs herein declared against.”

V. That the secretary of state shall print the question to be submitted on a separate ballot or on the same ballot with other constitutional questions. The ballot containing the question shall include 2 squares next to the question allowing the voter to vote “Yes” or “No.” If no cross is made in either of the squares, the ballot shall not be counted on the question. The outside of the ballot shall be the same as the regular official ballot except that the words “Questions Relating to Constitutional Amendments proposed by the 2009 General Court” shall be printed in bold type at the top of the ballot.

VI. That if the proposed amendment is approved by 2/3 of those voting on the amendment, it becomes effective when the governor proclaims its adoption.

Links

CACR3 at GenCourtMobile

Action Dates

Date Body Type

Bill Text Revisions

CACR3 Revision: 12373 Date: Jan. 12, 2009, midnight

Docket